When I got my green cheek conure, I was clueless about how to bathe her. Searching online only made things worse because people had so many different opinions. I tried looking for the brochure for the pet store I got her from, and I couldn’t get it.

Here’s why I was conflicted about the best way to bathe Twina (that’s her name).

Conures are not large birds. Twina is only 9.5 inches. Moreover, she weighs about 80g. While this is the standard weight for all conures, I just couldn’t risk it.

Different sources recommended that I provide a water bath for her, and when I tried, she treated it like it wasn’t there.

One time as I was cleaning her cage, I saw her bathing in her drinking water dish. And I got curious. So, can conures bathe in their water dish?

It’s completely normal to see a conure bathing in their water dish. While this may seem weird to some pet owners, it’s mostly a natural instinct. Conures in the wild drink and bathe in the same water source like rivers and streams.

With time I learned that there are various ways to bathe conures. Here’s a complete bathing guide to ease the bathing process for your conure.

How Suitable is it to Bathe in A Water Dish?

Granted, you’ll have to change the water once your bird finishes bathing. However, conures are safe bathing in their water dish.

Don’t encourage bathing in cold water, though. Let your bird do their thing! In fact, like other birds, conures like using their drinking water for bathing. Don’t be offended as they don’t know the difference. (Actually, they don’t care).  

Do Conures Have to Bathe?

Like human beings, conures get dirty. So, even though they don’t run in the mud or leave the house, conures accumulate dust and dirt in their feathers.

Besides, taking a bath after a day full of activities is perfect to wind down, even for conures. Keeping conures clean makes them comfortable, healthy, and happy.

A good bathing schedule and program allow conures to be their natural selves. Conures in the wild bathe too, and it’s only right to provide the same for our little beautiful parrots.

How Often Should Conures Bathe?

This is a genuine concern for many parrot owners. Yes, conures need to bathe, but how often? Furthermore, conures differ from one bird to another. So, you have to learn what works for your parrot.

Some prefer to shower every day, while others prefer to bathe once a week. A friend of mine has four sun conures, and they all have unique bathing schedules and favorite bathing methods. If you feel like your conure is not taking enough baths, calm down.

I would recommend ensuring your conure bathes at least once a week. If that is also a problem, check the water temperature and try to find out why they don’t enjoy baths.

Can You Bathe Your Conure?

There are different ways to bathe your conure. Each depends on how your bird reacts to bath sessions. However, here are three ways to help you out.

Using a Towel

With your parrot ready, take a washcloth and run it through lukewarm water (make sure the temperature is right because hot water is not suitable).

Once the cloth is moist, wring the excess water out. At this point, your conure should be still and calm. If they aren’t, make sure you speak to your bird and get them to relax.

Take the towel and rub down their wings and body. Ensure to check for any bits of dirt stuck in the feathers. It is good to reassure your bird about how good they are throughout the process. It’s a good way to bond.

Using a Spray Bottle

A simple spray bottle is also a good alternative. Add lukewarm water to the bottle and turn the nozzle to the mist setting.

Remember, you don’t want to overwhelm the conure by shooting large amounts of water at them. This method is not as good as the towel method, but it’s suitable for birds that are reluctant to get into their water baths or don’t enjoy towel baths.

Sink Bathing

My conure and I have come a long way since I got her. Every time I fill the kitchen sink to do the dishes, she comes and starts splashing around.

Conures love water (most of them anyway). So, whenever you are washing the dishes, you could fill the sink with lukewarm water and allow them to have some fun before you can get some work done.

If the kitchen sink does not work for you, conures also love bathtubs. If they are reluctant, try splashing some water on them. That usually works.

Is Soap Necessary When Bathing Conures?

Conures in the wild don’t have soap. Therefore, it’s unnecessary to add soap to bathwater. In fact, depending on the soap you use, it could add oil to the bird’s feathers. Moreover, the soap might contain ingredients to harm the bird’s skin (especially with heavy composition). 

Some cases might need you to use mild soap. Conures are playful and might get into some oil in their adventurous escapades. Then, and only then, is it allowed to use mild soap to clean your conure.

Try finding out from your vet the best brand of soap to use and ensure the bird is calm as you do the cleaning.

How Do You Dry a Conure After a Bath?

Whether the bird takes a bath in the water dish, water bath, sink, or bathtub, they would prefer to dry off naturally. As long as the room is warm, your bird should be fine. However, old age and cold seasons mean helping your bird to dry off.  

If the bird is young and vibrant, try moving the cage to a sunny place to fasten the drying process. If your conure does not mind being touched, use a small towel and be gentle.

Young conures, in particular, can get very wet. So, using a drying method such as a towel or hairdryer is suitable to keep them dry.

Hairdryers are not bad, as long as the temperature setting is cool. Warm or hot temperatures will scald your bird, and I’m sure you don’t want that to happen.

Conclusion

Don’t be alarmed if you notice your conure bathing in drinking water. It happens. If anything, you should be glad that your pet bird is taking a bath. Study your bird to learn how they prefer to bathe. If it’s in the sink or tub, make that happen for them.

Birds love to stay clean. In addition, bathing keeps conures healthy and leaves their feathers looking bright and clean.

Resources

How to Dry a Bird After a Bath

3 Different Ways of Bird Bathing: How & When To Give Your Parrot a Bath

Bathing and Showering for Pet Parrots

The Spruce Pets: Bathing Your Bird